avatar AndrΓ©s CΓ‘rdenas (@kandr3s)

🍿 Breathless Β· 1960 Β· β˜…β˜…β˜…β˜…

I've been wanting to watch Breathless for a long time now, today, after months, I finally got to watch it. My desire to watch this movie was based primarily on my will to expand my knowledge and appreciation of film as an art, but also, moved by the comments of film critics around the world that regard it as one of the finest films in the history of cinema. The praise on Breathless goes as far as "no debut film since Citizen Kane in 1942 has been as influential." (Roger Ebert, 2003). Having this in mind, I come across the

I’ve been wanting to watch Breathless for a long time now, today, after months, I finally got to watch it. My desire to watch this movie was based primarily on my will to expand my knowledge and appreciation of film as an art, but also, moved by the comments of film critics around the world that regard it as one of the finest films in the history of cinema. The praise on Breathless goes as far as β€œno debut film since Citizen Kane in 1942 has been as influential.” (Roger Ebert, 2003). Having this in mind, I come across the one question that matters here: what makes Breathless so great? And it seems like I’m missing a lot.

Initially, it takes some time to get accustomed to the constant, abrupt cuts and camera movements, which, I believe was at the time an innovative narrative style, but today is overused, especially by vloggers, that fact makes me feel uncomfortable. The overall pacing is catching and fast with the exception of a few scenes in which Michel and Patricia are in a single room and although they talk to each other, they both seem to be talking about different things. Michel is careless and untrustworthy, and I certainly don’t put that adjective on him because he murders, steals, and lies, but for the way he treats and even kisses Patricia, the woman he supposedly loves. However, at the end, when the inevitable finally arrives, my feelings lean over sympathy towards him because it seems that perhaps too late he learned something valuable about love and ultimately, life.